c The wild world of fashion eccentricities with the Daily Maverick– Lula Laora
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The wild world of fashion eccentricities with the Daily Maverick

The wild world of fashion eccentricities with the Daily Maverick

NEW EDITORIAL FEATURE! 

LULA LAORA was featured in the Maverick, listed as one of the “wild worlds of fashion eccentricities” following our Spring/Summer collection of 2021 Opium & Turtledoves. Our image features the LULA LAORA show during London Fashion Week in September 2020 at Studio Z in Brixton on September 22nd in London, England. 

The Daily Maverick is a South African daily online newspaper that faded in 2009 providing a unique blend of news, information, analysis and opinion delivered from their newsrooms in Johannesburg and Cape Town, South Africa. We are thrilled that they chose to showcase our runway show.  

WHICH PIECES WERE FEATURED? 

The wild world of fashion eccentricities with the Daily Maverick

The items featured were Fan Lacing shoes in white, as well as the Winged Dress with Hand. The dress features a slim lapel with a low and wide neckline, exposing the chest. The dress features large illustrations of clenched hands and wrists with the odd pink LULA LAORA logo inspired by graffiti art. The back of the top features a vertical opening held together with safety pins, and across using the dress fabric closing the back chest. Miranda Baron was the makeup artist for the show. 

PANDEMIC FASHION PIECES 

The wild world of fashion eccentricities with the Daily Maverick

The 2020 fashion week in September was an exquisite week not only in part because it’s arguably the most important fashion week, but also because it has come after a long pandemic “rest” of events. It was a much-anticipated event, and it lived up to expectations. Featured were extremely oversized tailoring, by the likes of Kimhekim and David Bell. Metallic armour protecting the wearer from the pandemic from Paco Rabanne, and countless face coverings. 

I don’t think the face coverings and masks have come to anyone as a surprise, but what is surprising the beauty and creativity behind them. From Francesca Liberatore to Moulham Obid, to Victoria/Tomas and Coco Rocha it is clear that the pandemic has rubbed off on the fashion industry, much as it has done everywhere else. It is few and far who have not been touched by the pandemic professionally and personally.   

HOW HAS COVID-19 CHANGED FASHION?

The wild world of fashion eccentricities with the Daily Maverick

According to Isabella West, a former economist and founder of Hirestreet - a fashion rental platform state that

“There is still a lot of uncertainty as to what consumer behaviour will look like post-pandemic. Even the best trend-forecasters will struggle to accurately predict what happens next in the wake of such fundamental behavioural shifts.” 

We don’t have a crystal ball to tell what the future holds, but we can look into the 1920s as a source of revival. It came after an economic downturn due to World War I, and the Spanish Flu of 1918. 

At the time what we now know as flapper fashion came into fruition, shorter hemlines and less fitted silhouettes became emblematic of pop culture. Items that made it easier to move around in when dancing about town and enjoying the nightlife. 

Given history, we’re likely to ditch the sweats. Masks on the other hand are here to stay. At least until BoJo tells us otherwise. Organic search results for fashionable masks have grown 502% on Lyst and they are unlikely to go anywhere. This is also something visible on runways. We can count ourselves lucky that the light blue mask doesn’t have to become a daily staple as there are more fashionable alternatives to shopping around. 

MADE-TO-ORDER PROGRAM 

The wild world of fashion eccentricities with the Daily Maverick

The runway piece is a MADE-TO-ORDER piece available online today. We champion slow fashion which is why many of our pieces are made-to-order. In addition to this, we also have a program called UPCYCLED. The collection features limited-edition capsules created with left-over fabrics from previous collections. Sustainability is an important part of our design process but also business ethos. 

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